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39 years

Old 1st May 2021, 15:32
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39 years

39 years ago today, Hermes carried out the first UK carrier strike mission since Suez when 12 Sea Harriers of 800 NAS attacked Stanley and Goose Green airfields on East Fakland. Despite the extremely heavy AAA, small arms and missile defence around Stanley - and the 35mm AAA at Goose - only one aircraft was hit. A lot of damage was done at both airfields and several aircraft were destroyed on the ground.

In the afternoon, SHARs took out a Canberra, 2 X Mirage 3s and a Dagger. 'Twas a busy day and as Brian Hanrahan (BBC reporter) said, "I counted them all out and I counted them all back again".

I should add that Black Buck 1 had also attacked Stanley with 21 bombs from a Vulcan before our dawn raid and set a world record for the longest bombing mission. Quite a feat of aviation and planning but unfortunately the one KRT that hit the runway did not preclude its use. It did do wonders for the morale of the local Brits - though not so much for the Argentines!

Swing the lamp!

Mog
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Old 1st May 2021, 16:07
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Originally Posted by Mogwi View Post
39 years ago today, Hermes carried out the first UK carrier strike mission since Suez when 12 Sea Harriers of 800 NAS attacked Stanley and Goose Green airfields on East Fakland. Despite the extremely heavy AAA, small arms and missile defence around Stanley - and the 35mm AAA at Goose - only one aircraft was hit. A lot of damage was done at both airfields and several aircraft were destroyed on the ground.

In the afternoon, SHARs took out a Canberra, 2 X Mirage 3s and a Dagger. 'Twas a busy day and as Brian Hanrahan (BBC reporter) said, "I counted them all out and I counted them all back again".

I should add that Black Buck 1 had also attacked Stanley with 21 bombs from a Vulcan before our dawn raid and set a world record for the longest bombing mission. Quite a feat of aviation and planning but unfortunately the one KRT that hit the runway did not preclude its use. It did do wonders for the morale of the local Brits - though not so much for the Argentines!

Swing the lamp!

Mog
Fine performances by FAA Aircrew throughout.

Some contemporaries and at least one name in TN Snr’s Log Book from his instructor days present during the conflict.

Will raise a glass tonight to those who didn’t return.

TN.
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Old 1st May 2021, 16:25
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Mog, just so happens I finished your book this morning, pure coincidence but fitting.

As for TN’s comment:


Fine performances by FAA Aircrew throughout.
It’s worth noting that the first poster was actually RAF at the time, along with a number of those on the NASs!!
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Old 1st May 2021, 16:52
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Well done to those that took part, and raise a glass to those who did not make it back. .
Davids book a damm good read
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Old 1st May 2021, 16:57
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Originally Posted by Ken Scott View Post
Mog, just so happens I finished your book this morning, pure coincidence but fitting.

As for TN’s comment:



It’s worth noting that the first poster was actually RAF at the time, along with a number of those on the NASs!!
A valid point of course, but always good to highlight the FAA - to which Mr M then transferred!!

TN.
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Old 1st May 2021, 17:21
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Originally Posted by tarantonight View Post
A valid point of course, but always good to highlight the FAA - to which Mr M then transferred!!

TN.
To reiterate before I suffer incoming.......

I was referring to FAA Aircrew in the conflict generally and taking nothing away from those in the light blue uniform - or AAC/RM.

TN.
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Old 1st May 2021, 18:37
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Let’s face it, BritMil did a splendid job afloat, ashore and in the air ... as an All-Arms All-Cap-Badge demonstration of Corporate application of force.

Respect to all who were there, and RIP to those who didn’t make it home.
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Old 1st May 2021, 19:45
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I had the pleasure of being taught by Sam Drennan who won a DFC for his actions at Tumbledown. From 656sqn.org.....while Drennan and Rigg accomplished a particularly difficult mission successfully when evacuating three Scots Guardsmen and a Gurkha from a very exposed and inaccessible position on Tumbledown. Tim Lynch was on Goat Ridge manning a rebro post,

‘From the top I could make out the Argentine hospital ship in Stanley harbour and a few of the houses on the outskirts. I settled down in the rocks and got to work. My abiding memories of that morning are of Captain Sam Drennan and Corporal Jay Rigg flying in and out of Tumbledown with Captain Drennan’s radio stuck on send, allowing me to eavesdrop on his comments as he flew in to what was a very dangerous situation.

After picking up the wounded, he would then scoot around Goat Ridge and fly low along the valley floor just below me. It was humbling to hear the determination with which he kept promising the guardsmen he would come back. Himself an ex-Scots Guardsman, I know that he knew some of the men personally and it was clear he would do everything he could for them. I recall hearing the voice of the Squadron Commander telling him he was under fire – again – in what sounded like an exasperated tone as though he was talking to a wayward kid.’

Sam Drennan was later awarded the DFC for his efforts that night in recovering sixteen wounded soldiers in the most hazardous of circumstances and in the course of seven sorties under enemy fire. His thoughts regarding his very busy night are as follows,

‘There were casualties scattered all over the mountain. At one point the Scots Guards were firing M79 grenades over the top of my Scout at a sniper 50 yards from us on the side of a hill. I don’t know how he could have missed us – probably the grenades landing around were putting him off a bit.’

I particularly liked his turn of phrase “ a brilliantly average....”
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Old 1st May 2021, 20:05
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39 years.

A successful operation completed in a short time against a capable airborne enemy.
Best wishes to all who served during that period including those back in the UK who were considered too valuable to send. Some were already packed, ready to go, for the whole period, should their extra presence be needed.
Respect and RIP to all those who didn't come home.

Sleeve Wing.
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Old 1st May 2021, 20:11
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Originally Posted by tarantonight View Post
A valid point of course, but always good to highlight the FAA - to which Mr M then transferred!!

TN.
Transferred back sounds better.
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Old 1st May 2021, 20:22
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Agreed with all sentiments, l remember seeing my mates off and the confusion that was Odiham in those days.
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Old 1st May 2021, 20:29
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Any link to Mogwi's book, please.
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Old 1st May 2021, 20:40
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Originally Posted by Douglas Bahada View Post
I had the pleasure of being taught by Sam Drennan who won a DFC for his actions at Tumbledown. From 656sqn.org.....while Drennan and Rigg accomplished a particularly difficult mission successfully when evacuating three Scots Guardsmen and a Gurkha from a very exposed and inaccessible position on Tumbledown. Tim Lynch was on Goat Ridge manning a rebro post,

‘From the top I could make out the Argentine hospital ship in Stanley harbour and a few of the houses on the outskirts. I settled down in the rocks and got to work. My abiding memories of that morning are of Captain Sam Drennan and Corporal Jay Rigg flying in and out of Tumbledown with Captain Drennan’s radio stuck on send, allowing me to eavesdrop on his comments as he flew in to what was a very dangerous situation.

After picking up the wounded, he would then scoot around Goat Ridge and fly low along the valley floor just below me. It was humbling to hear the determination with which he kept promising the guardsmen he would come back. Himself an ex-Scots Guardsman, I know that he knew some of the men personally and it was clear he would do everything he could for them. I recall hearing the voice of the Squadron Commander telling him he was under fire – again – in what sounded like an exasperated tone as though he was talking to a wayward kid.’

Sam Drennan was later awarded the DFC for his efforts that night in recovering sixteen wounded soldiers in the most hazardous of circumstances and in the course of seven sorties under enemy fire. His thoughts regarding his very busy night are as follows,

‘There were casualties scattered all over the mountain. At one point the Scots Guards were firing M79 grenades over the top of my Scout at a sniper 50 yards from us on the side of a hill. I don’t know how he could have missed us – probably the grenades landing around were putting him off a bit.’

I particularly liked his turn of phrase “ a brilliantly average....”
I had him as my instructor for a couple of trips on my pilots course, as well, in 1983. One of the best.
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:12
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Salute!

Thanks, Mogs, a good reminder of what a well-trained and motivated bunch can do.

I shall always resent your opportunity to demonstrate the Lima, and without the slaved mode we had in the Viper. Damn, but I wanted to see the thing actually work!

Gums sends...
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:19
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Never heard a slick 1000lb bomb called a KRT. What does KRT stand for?
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:24
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Sam Drennan. One of nicest men you’d ever recieve a bollicking from. And be under no illusions, you knew you’d received a bollicking.
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:36
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Originally Posted by Sloppy Link View Post
Sam Drennan. One of nicest men you’d ever recieve a bollicking from. And be under no illusions, you knew you’d received a bollicking.
From experience no doubt!!
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:49
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Originally Posted by MPN11 View Post
Let’s face it, BritMil did a splendid job afloat, ashore and in the air ... as an All-Arms All-Cap-Badge demonstration of Corporate application of force. Respect to all who were there, and RIP to those who didn’t make it home.
Absolutely, and with some real decision-making from No 10! I was enjoying a quiet life on NATIU at the time as a "hangar rat". Did that change overnight or wot!!!!!!

The first cab with "Shirley Basseys" installed was towed to the flight line for air test and delivery to go South while the "cartoonists" were still sat on board sketching what we'd installed such was the pace. While safe in Blighty, we were damn sure that we were going to do whatever we could for those in the line of fire.

To those who never made it back ..... and to those who did - often with hidden scars! Salute! H 'n' H
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Old 1st May 2021, 21:52
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Originally Posted by Peter G-W View Post
Never heard a slick 1000lb bomb called a KRT. What does KRT stand for?
A finger fumble I think - KRT is a 1000 (K) lbs Retarded Tail (RT)

Actual weapon used was KFF - 1000 (K) lbs Free Fall (FF)

Our US colleagues reading this are wondering why we just didn't flick the switch between hi-drag and low-drag as conditions required. Decades later I still cannot fathom it either. That said the UK bomb cases were better and same goes for our fuses* and our airburst capability; yet the most basic thing as an in-cockpit switch vs going out with the wrong bombs fitted seemed to elude us.

*Ignoring the early years of the MFBF
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Old 1st May 2021, 22:52
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On this day we were clearing and seeding grass on an old orchard in our new [old] home. Near Gainsborough.
One apple tree cut down had a sturdy trunk, which I sliced and hot-pokered "FALKLAND GREEN".

I was desperately keen at 1 Group Bawtry trying to help. I hope that I did.

We have the apple tree plaque still, as a memento of great days of heroism and professionalism, seen from many thousands of miles away..

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