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UK to Leave EASA

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UK to Leave EASA

Old 6th Mar 2020, 20:52
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UK to Leave EASA

Not sure if this has been already posted but Grant Shapps has confirmed UK is leaving EASA and will be self certifying.

Wow. Big step.

....Mods please delete if old news.
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Old 6th Mar 2020, 21:16
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From Aviation Daily:

UK ‘Will Leave’ EASA, Says British Transportation Secretary

Bill Carey March 06, 2020

UK State Secretary for Transportation Grant Shapps meets with Aviation Daily.
Credit: Bill Carey

WASHINGTON—The UK will withdraw as a member state of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) after a transition period and shift responsibility for aircraft certification and safety regulation to its own Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), British Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said.“We will leave EASA,” Shapps said Mar. 6 during an exclusive interview with editors from Aviation Daily and ATW. “A lot of the expertise they have is UK expertise, in fact. A lot of the key leading lights were Brits.”

Shapps, in Washington for meetings with U.S. officials, said the withdrawal from Cologne, Germany-based EASA was being negotiated at EU headquarters in Brussels. The break will happen after Dec. 31, when EU law no longer applies to the UK.

“So, the powers will revert to the CAA, who are probably one of the world’s leading regulators and the expertise will need to come home to do that, but we’ll do it in a gradual way,” Shapps said.

Outside of EASA membership, the UK will seek mutual recognition of certifications in bilateral agreements with other countries and blocs, he said.

The CAA eventually will assume responsibility for new aircraft type certificates and airworthiness approvals. Shapps suggested urban air mobility (UAM) vehicles will be among the first examples, saying he had met with UAM developer Joby Aviation during his trip.

“Over a period of time we’ll be wanting to develop our own [aircraft] certifications,” Shapps said. “One of the things we’ll want to do is be particularly forward-leaning in technology and automation. We’ll make sure our legislative framework is in a great place to enable those kinds of organizations to excel in the UK market.”

Since its “Brexit” withdrawal from the EU in January, the UK has been considered a “third country” within EASA, a status that will continue through the end of the year.

“During this time, the UK will be treated as an EU member state but will no longer take part in any decision-making or decision-shaping activities at EASA,” the safety agency states on its website.

The transition period can be extended between the parties once by up to two years, EASA says, which does not mention any UK withdrawal. A decision to extend the transition period would have to be made by July 1, the agency says.

Shapps said EASA has initiated infraction proceedings against the UK over its decision not to enact SERA (Standardized European Rules of the Air) visibility and distance from cloud minima in Class D airspace.

A Conservative member of Parliament who serves as a cabinet secretary under British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Shapps said his party’s decisive victory in the December 2019 general election represents a mandate for independent action. Parliament ratified Brexit a month after the election, and the UK officially withdrew from the EU on Jan. 31.

“We’ve just won the election in a very big way with a big majority and a proper sense of direction for five years,” Shapps said. “As you would expect from an independent nation, we can’t be subject to the rules and laws made by somebody else, so we can’t accept rules from the EU Commission and we can’t accept rulings in terms of court cases from the European Court of Justice or anybody else, any more than the U.S. would.”
https://aviationweek.com/air-transpo...tion-secretary


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Old 6th Mar 2020, 21:29
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Absolutely unbelievable.
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Old 6th Mar 2020, 21:47
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“So, the powers will revert to the CAA, who are probably one of the world’s leading regulators and the expertise will need to come home to do that, but we’ll do it in a gradual way,” Shapps said.
A tacit admission that the CAA hasn’t really got the quantity nor the quality of staff needed to run things in the way they would like?
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Old 6th Mar 2020, 22:24
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Good! Let’s hope they can rescind the very imminent and stupid changes to the VFR rules.
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Old 6th Mar 2020, 23:13
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About time. Can i get my UK license .
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Old 6th Mar 2020, 23:27
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Originally Posted by 1daneman View Post
About time. Can i get my UK license .

Was thinking that same - hopefully a return to the gold standard.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 00:34
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What possible benefit is this to anyone? Absolutely ridiculous.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 00:45
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Originally Posted by cashash View Post
Was thinking that same - hopefully a return to the gold standard.
Yep, time to brush up on those relevant technical questions like what colour is the light in the [email protected] gyros and how many detents are there on the speedbrake handle quadrant?
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 01:02
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Does this mean I don't have to remove the restrictions from my B1 licence? Are we reverting to section L and BCARS?

What a farce!
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 01:15
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Lunacy. Not having the ECJ as an arbitrator could invalidate every LOA, the UK Ireland FAB will be screwed, SES gone.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 02:21
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This is inevitable, for the reasons Shapps says.

And also a good thing - in my opinion!
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 02:50
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the UK will seek mutual recognition of certifications in bilateral agreements with other countries and blocs, he said.
hopefully that makes it easier to convert your license rather than having to sit the 14 exams again.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 05:08
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Yaah bring back CAP371 4th Edition for the FTL - then the few Airlines that are actually left (- Monarch, Thomas Cook, Flybe) won't have a level playing field but BALPA will be happy
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 05:15
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Originally Posted by anson harris View Post
What possible benefit is this to anyone? Absolutely ridiculous.
End of dangerous EASA FTL's and a return to scientifically backed ones
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 05:56
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Originally Posted by SpamCanDriver View Post
End of dangerous EASA FTL's and a return to scientifically backed ones
Biggest proponent of the EASA FTL was actually the UK in the relevant working groups.

There was actually a great paper from the Royal Aeronautical Society about the challenges for the CAA in becoming a full fledged authority again, which basically said that it takes hundreds of extra employees in required manpower and around 5 years to be able to fulfill all roles again. Will be an interesting time ahead for the UK aerospace sector i guess. But then, seeing that new simulators for example are danish certified instead of UK, there might be a reason for stuff like that.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 06:25
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Originally Posted by Denti View Post
Biggest proponent of the EASA FTL was actually the UK in the relevant working groups.

There was actually a great paper from the Royal Aeronautical Society about the challenges for the CAA in becoming a full fledged authority again, which basically said that it takes hundreds of extra employees in required manpower and around 5 years to be able to fulfill all roles again. Will be an interesting time ahead for the UK aerospace sector i guess. But then, seeing that new simulators for example are danish certified instead of UK, there might be a reason for stuff like that.
The Danish qualifications in UK are only CAE FSTDs as their Head Office address is in Copenhagen!!

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Old 7th Mar 2020, 06:33
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Originally Posted by Denti View Post
There was actually a great paper from the Royal Aeronautical Society about the challenges for the CAA in becoming a full fledged authority again, which basically said that it takes hundreds of extra employees in required manpower and around 5 years to be able to fulfill all roles again.
Here's the relevant extract - it makes sobering reading.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 06:51
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This is the most idiotic move. Brexiteers can look forward to the massive front-loaded cost of trying to turn the denuded and incompetent CAA into anything vaguely fit for purpose.

We’re much more likely to end up with something third world. In the meantime the UK industry will continue to collapse, the economic downturn will finish the kill on airlines and GA, and there will be nothing left to regulate.

There aren’t words to express my anger at what’s happening now.
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Old 7th Mar 2020, 06:58
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That's fine let the UK have their own license BUT then the UK pilots must not be permitted to fly any EASA registered aircraft without re-writing their entire ATPL syllabus and also re doing 15 000 Euro worth of flying training to obtain an EASA license.

Why do I say this???

I've been flying ten years now & have a full ATPL from yet another reputable authority. However despite all that am in the process of re-writing my ATPL (whilst working max FDP) and saving up so I can train on twin pistons again. All so I can fly an EASA registration because apparently even after 10 years and writing the same exams I don't know how to fly. A great deal of my friends who have been flying for longer are doing the same.

So in short, to keep in line with EASA rules UK pilots must be treated the same if they wish to leave EASA. They must also have to re-write and re do their entire license should they wish to fly an EASA registered aircraft.

Last edited by Runway Change; 7th Mar 2020 at 07:43.
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